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Weekly News, Analysis, and Commentary

Large Joints Features & News

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AAOS Award Winning Paper Presented Stunning Conclusion

Radiographs of experimentally created mouse tibial plateau fracture (left) and clinically observed human tibial plateau fracture (right). Reprinted with permission from Furman BD, Strand J, Hembree WC, Ward BD, Guilak F, Olson SA: Joint degeneration following closed intraarticular fracture in the mouse knee: A model of posttraumatic arthritis. J Orthop Res 2007;25:578–592
Radiographs of experimentally created mouse tibial plateau fracture (left) and clinically observed human tibial plateau fracture (right). Reprinted with permission from Furman BD, Strand J, Hembree WC, Ward BD, Guilak F, Olson SA: Joint degeneration following closed intraarticular fracture in the mouse knee: A model of posttraumatic arthritis. J Orthop Res 2007;25:578–592

This year’s $20,000 Kappa Delta Sorority Award winning paper looked at the problem of post-traumatic arthritis of the knee in a new and novel way and may well have uncovered a remarkable new therapy or approach to preventing arthritis in knee trauma cases.

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Perka Debates Barrack Over Ceramic on Ceramic Hip

Image created by RRY Publications, LLC
Image created by RRY Publications, LLC

“Ceramic-ceramic is a good option for the young, active patient. It is wear resistant, has improved lubrication, and allows thin inserts for large heads,” argues Carsten Perka. “Ceramic has long been on a steady decline,” says Robert Barrack. “There are malposition issues (leading to impingement and potential for failure), liner breakage and mal-seating and squeaking. Why pay more for something that is not improved?”

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3 Doctors in Syria’s Hell

Image created by RRY Publications, LLC / Source: Wikimedia Commons and Scott Bobb
Image created by RRY Publications, LLC / Source: Wikimedia Commons and Scott Bobb

Three doctors who were thrust in the middle of Syria’s chaotic hell tell their story this week. So many of our colleagues also served and these stories remind the rest of us of the astonishing courage, perseverance and dedication to patients that these combat doctors display in the middle of such searing, tragic circumstances. We are privileged to be able to convey these remarkable stories.

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Jones v. Mullaji: The Tourniquetless Total Knee

Image created by RRY Publications, LLC
Image created by RRY Publications, LLC

“Let it bleed,” argues Dickey Jones. “Tranexamic acid has been a game changer, and use of a CarboJet increases cement penetration. You don’t need a tourniquet.” Arun Mullaji says, “You should use a tourniquet because it helps reduce blood loss, provides much better clarity, and it gives you a better cement mantle.”

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Lombardi Takes on Ranawat Over Bi-Cruciate Retaining Total Knees

Image created by RRY Publications, LLC
Image created by RRY Publications, LLC

“With bi-cruciate retaining knees the patient has normal kinematics, improved range of motion, and pain relief is equivalent to a total knee,” argues Adolph Lombardi. “We are repeating the mistakes of the past,” counters Chit Ranawat. “You must match the lateral condyle posterior slope—very hard. Preserving both cruciate ligaments is technically challenging. And the most quoted paper on this (by Cloutier) found that the survival rate at 20 years was no better than other knees done at the same time.”